fantasy football     JOIN THE HUDDLE    
HOME ARTICLES NEWS DRAFT GUIDE REGULAR SEASON STATISTICS NFL TEAMS MESSAGE BOARDS

FANTASY FOOTBALL WEEKLY FEATURES

2-Dimensional Players
Joe Levit
September 22, 2004

In fantasy football, a few points in a crucial contest can make all the difference during a particular campaign. There are some exceptional players who have the potential in any game to get those extra points necessary to pull out a victory, and you should at least consider acquiring those players, even at a high cost.

These multi-threat mavens, who make headlines for the most part doing what their position requires, also moonlight in a second role, nearly literally giving you two players for the price of one. If they are getting shut down or shut out one way, they may break off a big play in another capacity.

Compare for instance a running back like Domanick Davis to, say, Jamal Lewis. Almost everyone would agree that Lewis lugs the ball better than Davis, but so far this year Davis is the better fantasy running back, because he has already caught 16 balls for 165 yards. That converts to 16 points in most leagues, and means that whoever has Davis is getting not only a running back but also a receiver in the deal.

Likewise, quarterbacks who can pass for 300-yard games are fine, but those guys who convert when they call their own number at the goal line, and run for first downs in a game, are golden. Peyton Manning is a terrific fantasy player, but scrambling isn’t his strong suit.

Jeff Garcia is a bargain player year after year because he has a nose for the end zone, and the legs to take him there. Garcia has already scored a rushing touchdown for the Browns this year, and is likely to attempt some more keepers, netting many fantasy owners an extra two points during those scores, since so many leagues award two or more points more for a rushing score than for a passing one. That is often the difference in a tight game against an archrival.

Get some of the players below, and your team will have added some get up and go, on more than one fantasy front.

Michael Vick – Just two years ago Vick had 777 yards rushing and 8 TDs. His 12 carries for 109 rushing yards this week against the Rams verified his 2D stud status.

Daunte Culpepper – He had a touchdown run called back on a holding penalty, and fumbled at the goal line on another probable scoring run this week in the Monday night game. In addition to the 343 yards passing he also managed 43 yards rushing. Culpepper has shown the ability to bull the ball in on short-yardage jaunts. He managed four rushing scores last year but had 10 the year before.

Steve McNair – He also will get rushing touchdowns because of his size and extreme strength. He posted four last season and has hit eight twice in his career.

Donovan McNabb – McNabb is nearly as strong as Culpepper and McNair and more nimble than any quarterback except Vick. He ran one in from 20 yards out this week against the Vikings and likes to keep it near the end zone.

Jeff Garcia –gets a lot of scores on the ground. He had seven last season.

Marshall Faulk – When healthy, he is a dynamic runner and receiver. Remember that at one point, albeit in 1999, he topped 1,000 yards in both rushing and receiving.

LaDainian Tomlinson – He totaled100 receptions last year for 725 yards. In leagues that award points per reception, having LT on your team is a huge advantage.

Domanick Davis – Davis is 10 th in the league in receiving yards so far this season.

Tiki Barber – Just because Coughlin is giving the Great Dayne another shot doesn’t mean that Barber now fails to be a productive fantasy player. He still makes plays every time he is given the chance, and if Dayne is now out for any length of time, Barber will display his wares once more.

Priest Holmes – Holmes caught 74 passes last year, and may be required to do as much this season, especially with the sorry state of the receiving corps for Kansas City.