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Understanding YOUR Scoring System with LAG
August 13, 2007

One of the most fundamental and important things you can do as a fantasy team owner is to understand exactly what your fantasy scorings rules do to player values. Before you start searching for the new batch of sleepers or formulate any sort of draft plan, you have to be sure that you are aware of how player value works in your specific league - both within the positions and how the positions relate to each other. Learning how to use League Analysis and Graphing (LAG) was covered in part articles such as League Analysis and Graphing a couple of years ago and also is explored in much greater depth in the book Fantasy Football: The Next Level which is currently available online at Amazon.com and in most major booksellers like Barnes & Noble. If you have never done a LAG to your league before, it is highly recommended to at least read the above article if not buy the book for a more detailed explanation of how to create and examine them.

What a LAG will do is to take the past results of your league from the prior season and then quickly and easily turn them into a line graph for simple viewing and also determine what the difference is to your fantasy team from owning a top three player (the ultimate studs in the position), a top ten player (a solid starter for your team) and a player that ranks from 11 to 20 (either a second starter or even a first start if it doesn't affect your overall team strength. The main intent of a LAG is to arm you with the knowledge of how your specific league scoring treats the NFL positions. Each year there is remarkably little variation in what players gain in the NFL outside of the top three in each position - just the names change. About the only notable change every year is just how big a season those top three will have.

Doing a LAG and carrying that information with you into your draft assists you in making quick decisions that can help you build an optimal team from your draft slot in your scoring rules. Once those first dozen running backs are ripped from the shelves, what is the real advantage in taking a wideout or Peyton Manning? Or just doubling down and grabbing the second running back? It's all about how quickly value declines in a position, how it relates to all other positions and what is going to give you the optimal set of starters every week.

For example purposes, I have taken ten different scoring systems and done basic LAGs on them. You can review the scoring systems below and see if any are close to what you use if you do not have the time to do a LAG. I took the scoring systems that I found on several sites on the internet and then applied them to 2006 statistics to show how players are valued in them. If you played in one of these exact scoring systems the numbers I generated may not be exactly the same as your league but they should be very close - let me know if I need to adjust any if there is a significant deviation. For many of the sites and contests that I found, they could have several scoring systems depending on what they were offering so look more at the scoring rules below than at what place the system came from. I include some brief analysis of each LAG but you could obviously look more in-depth into the graph and numbers if you use that scoring system.

When you view the graph from a LAG, note how the decline in player value goes for each position and then during your draft it is easier to envision what that graph would look like once, say, the top dozen running backs and a couple of wideouts are gone. In applying a LAG to your draft, realize in essence that a LAG actually changes with each draft pick made (assuming decent picks are made) and should always consider the tendencies of league mates when they draft. Just because one line is higher than another doesn't necessarily mean you should take from the higher scoring position if you know you can wait a round and still reach them. You just need to be made aware of positional value and then apply that to your draft as it unfolds.

In the scoring below, all two point play participants always got 2 points and were not included in the scoring rundown though they were included in the actual scoring. I also did not include placekickers on the LAGs though you can on your own. The position is so notoriously changing each year and yet the difference from one to another is so minimal that I did not bother with them for clarity's sake. Plus you are not likely to worry about when you should mix in a kicker in the first five or six rounds. At least I really, really hope.

Scoring System Passing Points Rushing Points Catching Points Defense Points

CBS Sportsline

Click here
for LAG

25 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Int./Fumble = -2
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Fumble = -2
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Fumble = -2

Touchdown = 6
Sacks = 1
Turnovers = 2
Safety = 2

Points Allowed
0-6 = 8
7-13 = 6
14-20 = 4
21-27 = 2

Yardage Allowed
0-49 = 12
50-99 = 10
100-149 = 8
150 - 199 = 6
200-249 = 4
250-299 = 2


ESPN

Click here
for LAG

25 yards = 1
Touchdown = 4
Int./Fumble = -2
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Fumble = -2
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Fumble = -2
Touchdown = 6
Sacks = 1
Turnovers = 2
Safety = 2
Blocked kick = 2
Points Allowed
0-1 = 10
2-6 = 7
7-13 = 4
14-17 = 1
22-27 = -1
28-34 = -4
35-45 = -7
46+ =-10

Fanball

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for LAG

20 yards = 1
Touchdown = 4
TD > 40 yds = +2
TD > 80 yds = +4
Interception = -2
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
TD > 40 yds = +2
TD > 80 yds = +4
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
TD > 40 yds = +2
TD > 80 yds = +4
Touchdown = 6
Sacks = 2
Fumble = 1
Interception = 2
Safety = 4


 

Fox

Click here
for LAG

25 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Int./Fumble = -2
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Fumble = -2
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Fumble = -2
Touchdown = 6
Sacks = 1
Turnovers = 2
Safety = 2
Blocked kick = 2
Points Allowed
0-1 = 12
2-6 = 7
7-13 = 4
14-20 = 1
28-34 = -1
35-41 = -4
42+ =-7

NFFC

Click here
for LAG

20 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Int./Fumble = -1
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Fumble = -1
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Fumble = -1
Catch = 1 (WR,TE)
Catch = 0.5 (RB)

Touchdown = 6
Sacks = 1
Turnovers = 2
Safety = 2
 
WCOFF

Click here
for LAG

20 yards = 1
Touchdown = 4
Interception = -1
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Catch = 1
Touchdown = 6
Sacks = 1
Turnovers = 2
Safety = 2


 
WCAFF

Click here
for LAG

20 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Interception = -1
Fumble = -1
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Fumble = -1
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Fumble = -1
Catch = 1

Touchdown = 6
Sacks = 1
Turnovers = 2
Safety = 2
Points Allowed:
0 = 5
1-6 = 2
7-12 = 1

Yahoo

Click here
for LAG

25 yards = 1
Touchdown = 4
Interception = -1
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Catch = 1
Touchdown = 6
Sacks = 1
Turnovers = 2
Safety = 2


 

HuddlePerfect

Click here
for LAG

20 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
Interception = -1
10 yards = 1
Touchdown = 6
10 yards = 1 (WR)
5 yards = 1 (TE)
Touchdown = 6
Catch = 1 (WR, TE)
Touchdown = 6
Sacks = 1
Turnovers = 2
Safety = 2
Opp Off. TD = -3
Yards Allowed
0-150 = 10
151-250 = 5
251-350 = 0
351-400 = -5
451-500 = -10
501+ = -15

TD Only (real NFL)

Click here
for LAG

 

Touchdown = 6 Touchdown = 6 Touchdown = 6 Touchdown = 6
Safety = 2
 

Related Articles

Picking Players That Score a Lot of Points
2007 Offensive Line Preview Spectacular
Ultimate RBBC Review
Ease of Schedule Quarterbacks / Wide Receivers
Ease of Schedule Running Backs
Better Than Average Rankings
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